Tuesday, February 09, 2016

Al Gore's Pope Francis' prayer intentions for February 2016


You may remember the Holy Father's prayer intentions for January 2016, which seemed to be a call to recognize something like common good will in all world religions. Something like that.

Which leads me to ask: what happened to the Gospel? the Great Commission? Can someone help me understand this? Is this intended as a strategic move to get beyond the ascendant "bad press" surrounding the Catholic Church in recent years? Is it intended to show that the Church is "on board" with the most enlightened self-congratulatory instincts of the contemporary global culture? Is it intended to stave off persecution? Or is this what the Holy Father takes to be the heart of the Church's urgent Gospel message? Has the Catholic Church embraced the paradigm that H. Richard Niebuhr called the Christ of Culture? Has the Gospel been reduced to an echo of the world, an echo of what the world is already fashionably telling itself? This is all slickly edited and everything, but it sounds more like a public service announcement sponsored by the Green Party or Sierra Club than a proclamation of divine mercy (in this Jubilee Year of Mercy) for which the Son of God had to atone by sacrificing His life for the sins of the world. Sin? Whatever became of sin? Clarity, please.

Come to Norcia, Italy, for two weeks this July!


While you're there, study St. Paul's Letter to the Hebrews, and enjoy visiting Italy! See the Summer Program for 2016, "The Transcendent Christ: St. Paul's Letter to the Hebrews" Albertus Magnus Center for Scholastic Studies. Participate in a seminar, and hear lectures by the 'masters' of theology, who are this year members of the monastery of St. Benedict in Norcia, with a keynote by Fr. Cassian Folsom. Cost is only 900 Euros, with texts included. Norcia is a small town in the beautiful mountain region of southeastern Umbria near Perugia. Registration deadline is May 16, 2016.

Also, see the photographs posted HERE, including images of the local wine of choice.


[Hat tip to P.K.]

Monday, February 08, 2016

For the record: Alan W. Down on US foreign policy and religious liberty

Alan W. Dowd, "Not to be trusted" (The american Legion, January 19, 2016). Interesting.

Fr. Perrone: Why should Catholics make reparation for their sins during Lent?

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" [temporary link] (Assumption Grotto News, February 7, 2016) [emphasis mine]:
You were pre-warned of Lent’s approach and we are soon made to face it. I want this coming season to be profitable for you. A word needs be said about the meaning of it all.

Why do we go through the annual exercise of Lent? Among the plausible answers is that this is a time to meditate on the Lord’s Passion. This is a “traditional” response to Lent, and it has a long list of saints that stands behind it. Modern attempts to make sense of Lent have done away with this aspect of it because the emphasis on the sufferings and redemptive death of Christ–even in the Mass as the sacrifice of Calvary renewed–has been obscured, if not denied. Just as we have a long period of celebration of the Resurrection in the Easter season so we have a lengthy season devoted to the memory of the Lord’s Passion. This reason for having Lent should remain. Moreover, it has great power to deepen our union with Christ.

Another motive for the Forty Days is to make reparation for our sins by penitential practices. Here again, the notion of causing oneself inconvenience, of denying some good things to oneself, of taking on some form of self-punishment in compensation for wrongdoing is very far from the modern self-absorbed mind. We ought to realize, however, that unless we do penance in reparation we will be made to pay the debt of sin’s temporal punishments in the life hereafter. This kind of reparative Lenten practice then is a form of justice to God whose honor has been derogated by sin.

Yet another reason for Lent has to do with making substantive spiritual betterment of oneself. This need not be something discreditable or unworthy of our Lenten goals. As long as a supernatural intention is present in our minds we can and should seek to improve ourselves through fasting and other forms of penance.

A whole other question is how effective such practices may be in the long run and whether or not, once Lent will have passed, our old, bad ways will return. To respond to this one should note that self improvement is always a difficult thing to access for oneself. We may seem, after Lent is over, to be going back to our former selves without any discernible and lasting change having taken place. God alone, however, is the One to make the true evaluation of our efforts, weighing them justly. We cannot accurately estimate them. One should not be reluctant to practice good works or to impose self disciplines because of the seeming futility of their  effectiveness in the long run. Recall that there is merit for all works done in a state of grace and it is this “weight” of our good deeds which constitutes their essential value–not the discernible and measurable effects they have for our improvement.

Some Lenten things for the record. Ash Wednesday is a day of fast and abstinence from meat. Blessed ashes will be given at the beginning of the two Masses, 7:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Distribution will also take place at noon, but without a Mass. All Fridays of Lent are strictly binding as meatless days. Every Friday there will be the K of C Fish Fry in the gym from 4:00 until 7:00. I will be giving talks there on the Psalms, sharing with the people some of the richness that I have discovered in teaching my home school course. These talks will be in the gym, during the last part of the fish dinner. Only those dining there will be able to hear the talks. Stations of the Cross will follow these meals at 7:30 (note the new time). Friday evening Mass will succeed the Stations, sometime around 7:45. Thursday is the commemoration of Our Lady of Lourdes, a special day in view of our Lourdes Grotto. If it is opportune, we will pray the rosary at the Grotto on that day. This will be announced at Mass.

Fr. Perrone

Sunday, February 07, 2016

Substantial interview with Bp Athanasius Schneider on SSPX, women and foot washing, consecrating Russia, anti-pastoral bishops, and more

As always, Bishop Schneider offers an amplitude of ecclesiastical red meat (appropriately before Lent!) in this exclusive interview with Rorate Caeli (February 1, 2016). Some quotable quotes here, which, if I had time, I would excerpt for you; but just read it. Very good, as always.

Tridentine Community News - The priestly & religious duty, great importance, intercessory value, and happiness of daily praying the Divine Office; books; TLM Mass times


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (February 7, 2016):
February 7, 2016 – Quinquagésima Sunday

Praying the Divine Office

Today we reprint an interesting page concerning praying the Breviary from the web site www.catholicismhastheanswer.com:

Pray the traditional Divine Office of the Roman Rite according to various promulgations, including the monastic usage of the Benedictines, here: http://divinumofficium.com/cgi-bin/horas/officium.pl


To listen daily to the hours of Lauds and Vespers sung in Latin according to the Breviárium Monásticum by the Benedictine Monks of Norcia go here: http://osbnorcia.org/en/category/audio. To listen daily (and even LIVE) to the hours of Lauds, Prime, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline sung in Latin according to the Breviárium Monásticum by the Benedictine Monks of Le Barroux in France go here: http://www.barrouxchant.com.

Buy the Latin-English edition of the Roman Office with the rubrics of 1962 and the Gallican Psalter here: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=59#tab=tab-1.

Buy the Latin only edition of the 1962 Roman Office Diurnále here: http://www.fraternitypublications.com/diurnale.html. Buy the Latin-English edition from 1963 of the Monastic Diurnále here: http://www.clearcreekmonks.org/_product/monastic-diurnal-liturgical-book.html

Pray the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary as promulgated under Pope Saint Pius X here: http://office.ageofmary.com. And you can buy the Latin-English edition of the Little Office promulgated in 1962 here: https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=47#tab=tab-1

The Divine Office
By Saint Alphonsus Marie de Liguori  

VII. The Recitation of the Office.  

The Great Importance of the Divine Office as Regards the Faithful

To praise God, to thank him for his benefits, to ask of him the graces necessary to eternal salvation this is what should be here below the only occupation of all men. But because seculars are absorbed by worldly occupations, the Church wishes that not only ecclesiastics, but that religious of both sexes should consecrate at least certain hours of the day to praising God, and praying to him for all the faithful as well as for the welfare of Christian society. Hence when the clerics, personifying in some way the whole Christian people, present themselves before God in order to recite the divine Office, it is a prayer truly universal that they offer before the throne of the Divinity. “There is no doubt,” says St. Thomas Aquinas, “that the prayer is universal which the ministers of the Church offer to God in the name of the people.” (Summa Theológiæ, Secúnda Secúndæ, Question 83, Article 12)

The same holy Doctor thus shows us that in the Divine Office there is a public function, imposed upon clerics for the preservation and increase of the Church. He says: "Since to the chant of the hymns and the psalms the divine Office is celebrated, there is accomplished in the Church of God a public ministry, organized for the good of all.” (Opusc, xxix. c. 5.)  St. Bernard had already said that upon ecclesiastics is chiefly incumbent a triple charge: to preach the word of God, to give good example, and to pray for all. “There are three obligations that remain to us: preaching, good example, prayer; and the latter surpasses the other two;” (Epistle 201, n. 3.) this he adds, in order to exalt prayer above eloquence and the most beautiful examples of virtue.

  The Divine Office Especially Important to Priests

  We thence understand what terrible punishments God reserves for those who, obliged to recite the Office, abstain from saying it either through wearisomeness or in order to give themselves to worldly amusements. But let us leave these persons who are struck with blindness, and let us speak of those who recite the Office in a careless manner. What a pity to see how certain priests recite the breviary in the streets, at some window, their eyes fixed on those passing by, or in the society of friends, with whom they laugh and jest, thus intermingling the divine praises with worldly and improper conversation, without paying any attention to the sacred words. If any one of them, when admitted to the presence of a great personage of this world, dared to speak to him in this way, he would certainly be driven away and punished. Alas! some priests have the audacity to treat God as if their mission was not to honor but to dishonor him.

  What Treasures of Grace one finds in the Office

  On the other hand, when one recites the Office with attention, what merit and what profit does one derive from it. What lights are then obtained from the divine words! With what holy maxims is the soul penetrated! How many acts of love, of confidence, of humility, of contrition, may one not make by merely paying attention to the verses that one recites! Above all, what beautiful prayers are found in each psalm! There is no doubt that, when recited with faith and fervor, they merit treasures of grace, according to the infallible promise made by our Lord that he would hear whoever prays to him: Ask, and it shall be given you.(Matt. 8:7) For every one that asketh, receiveth.(Luke 9:10)

What Happiness is enjoyed in reciting the Office  


I add that the Office, recited without devotion and with the only thought of finishing it as soon as possible, becomes one of the heaviest burdens and at the same time is so tedious as to seem to be of an interminable length; on the contrary, when it is recited with devotion, with a true desire of profiting by it, by applying mind and heart to the sacred words, its burden becomes light and sweet: of this all the saints have had experience. The saints found more pleasure in reciting the Office than worldlings find in the midst of pastimes and amusements.  One single Office recited with devotion may gain for us many degrees of glory in heaven. What treasures of merit will not they, then, amass after they have recited the breviary for thirty or forty years with the required devotion and piety!  This is what has inspired me with the difficult undertaking of translating the psalms. May those who by the duty of their state are bound to recite the breviary, recite it with merit and profit to their souls! May they, while escaping the misfortune of reciting the breviary badly, be spared the pain of having one day to render a terrible account before the tribunal of God and then to expiate the innumerable faults that they have committed!

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 02/08 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (St. John of Matha, Confessor)
  • Tue. 02/09 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary (St. Cyril of Alexandria, Bishop, Confessor, & Doctor)
  • Wed. 02/10 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Josaphat (Ash Wednesday)
  • Wed. 02/10 7:30 PM: High Mass at St. Alphonsus-Windsor (Ash Wednesday)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for February 7, 2016. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Thursday, February 04, 2016

Fr. Perrone on the commodification of human beings in porn and abortion, as reflected in the McDonaldization of death

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" [temporary link] (Assumption Grotto News, January 31, 2016):
Funeral customs are fast a-changing in our time. Speaking recently with a local funeral director, I was shocked to learn about the new thinking of how we bid adieux to the dead, viz. with increased indifference and quick dismissal. It’s so very inconvenient to have someone’s death interfere with whatever one happens to be busy about. The old obsequies of making visits to the funeral home to “pay one’s respects,” of comforting the mourners, of praying for the happy repose of the departed, of taking time off from other demanding necessities in order to perform these corporal works of mercy–all that is fast vanishing from American life. In its place, according to my funeral director friend, is something like this. No funeral home visitation; no flowers or Mass offerings; the quickview scan of the online bio of the deceased with its ready-at-hand link to register a brief word of sympathy; cremation for the corpse; and, often, no funeral service or requiem Mass. Moreover, the strictly forbidden retention of the deceased’s cremains or, worse, their scattering to the four winds, is becoming more prevalent. In short, we’re making rapid disposal of the dead, just as we had avoided contact with them as living persons in their last years of life, allowing them to rot in a nursing home or hospice facility. (Even that fate is now become accounted as fortunate since the administration of painkilling drugs in high doses can speed along the death processes so as to avoid all the inconveniences of what we had been accustomed to call one’s “final illness.”)  
What’s caused these new customs, these new ways of thinking about the dead and the process of dying? For one thing, we’re all on life’s fast track. We have now no time to be bothered by the death (or even the life) of anybody else when we’re so busy getting done whatever we must do–or even–whatever we think advantageous to ourselves–even our own pleasures and idle leisure. And what’s behind that selfish preoccupation? A number of things. The indoctrination of Selfism has long been forming our attitudes, succeeded to convince us that only the Great I am worthy of myself, my time, my deeds; only my goals are important; only what I want–morally good or bad–is what I must have; and whatever may interfere with these ‘goals’–God and religion included–must be set aside. And how did we arrive at this?  
Among the contributing causes to this attitude and way of living is the ever increasing use of porn which reduces the human person to so many body parts for exploitation and titillation of the senses. The fact that the “models” who so shamelessly expose themselves for public viewing are real people with minds and consciences, with souls that have human feelings–these facts have been put out of mind with porn use. Other people are toys. They can be bought, used, abused and are disposable. This contributes to estimate that the bodies of the deceased are as so much useless trash. 

Another thing that has shaped our thinking about the body is our relative unconcern over the hideousness of crushing and dismembering babies in the womb. Killing babies or–worse yet–selling its surviving parts as ‘spares’ for the living or as ingredients for cosmetics–is regarded as a social good. But it’s an old heresy which regards the human body this way where it was said that only a person’s spirit, (soul) counts. The body is unimportant. This specious premise, which at first glance may seem an ascetical, spiritual perspective, is in fact a way of so denigrating the body as to make utilitarian use of it without a care to any moral considerations of it or even to consider the meaning of the human person as a unity, a totality, of spirit and body.  
Our world is changing fast, and with it our thinking about who (or what) we are. Necessarily we will think about God and the Catholic faith differently (and not for the better). We are transhumanizing, becoming something else. Monsters, I would say, caricatures of what we were made to be–the image of God–and of what we were privileged to become as Christians–children of God and Christs-in-miniature.  While we may not be able at large to stop these horrible denigrating ways of inhumanity, we can retain the consciousness of our human dignity and our Christian vocation to holiness and refuse to go with the flow. Keeping ourselves unsullied by all the filth this fallen world offers and by the devout practice of the Catholic life is a goal within the reach of all of us. 
Fr. Perrone

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

How was the 16th Amendment 'ratified'? "103 consecutive years of legalised theft because what LOLA wants LOLA Gets"

Brought to you from the ever-endaring Amateur Brain Surgeon at www.letmecarveonyou.com (February 3, 2016), featuring, of course, LOLA (Legalised Oligarchy's Larcenous Aeaeae):


Or, as ABS but it in single breath:
The establishment wanted to take your money and spend it on their projects because they have always known how to spend it more wisely than you because y'all are acerebral limaceous lackeys who are not concerned with international business and international corporations and international banking but are selfishly focused of your faith and your family and y'all are easily denuded of your possessions by men who speak of national exceptionalism and so today we celebrate our One Hundred and Third consecutive year of being picked clean by the usurious establishment via the magic of a non-existent amendment.
Whew! He's breathing again now! (I think.) Read more >>

[Hat tip to ABS Ministries]

Monday, February 01, 2016

Hour-long Catholic critique of the Alpha program


Some people aren't going to like this at all. "The Tyranny of Emotion" (Mic'd Up, January 29, 2016) includes a discussion with Michael Hichborn of the Lepanto Institute about the Alpha program being implemented in many places and notably in Detroit; and Dr. Jay Boyd, who offers an in-depth discussion of Sherry Waddell's Forming Intentional Disciples with some cautions.

The upshot seems concisely expressed in the question: why are Catholics embracing these 'watered-down' and 'protestantized' sorts of programs when excellent Catholic alternatives exist, such as Servant of God, Fr. John Hardon's Marian Catechist Apostolate, now under the sponsorship of Cardinal Burke? Not to mention all the hazards of emotionally-charged low-information evangelization with potentially misleading components. Food for thought. One can hardly say "food for feeling," can we!

Sunday, January 31, 2016

"Of all the post-conciliar popes, Benedict was the one who finally blinked"


Fr. Karl Rahner with Fr. Joseph Ratzinger during Vatican II
~ Breakin' the law! Breakin' the law! Look, mom, no clerics! ~

A provocative response to those rejecting a favorable comparison of Benedict with Pope Francis. By traditionalist journalist, Michael Matt, "Benedict & Francis: Two Peas in a Papal Pod?" (Remnant, January 26, 2016). Matt offers an educated guess as to why Benedict abdicated, or had to abdicate, suggesting that packs of liberal wolves hounded him out of office. (What pressures they brought to bear, God only knows.) He compares Benedict, whose Summorum Pontificum and lifting of the SSPX excommunications outraged many, with the direction Francis has taken things, asking: "What would life be like right now without the powerful spiritual bulwarks (and human consolation!) provided by hundreds of traditional Mass centers around the world, established as a direct result of [Summorum Pontificum]?" Could anyone in his right mind contend that the escalating crisis in the Church today would not have been exponentially worse, he asks, were it not for those bulwarks thrown up by Benedict? "They got rid of [Benedict] for a reason, which the St. Gallen Group now brazenly admits," writes Matt. "Of all the post-conciliar popes, Benedict was the one who finally blinked. And history may well reveal that the reign of Pope Benedict helped undermine the very Modernist revolution which, ironically enough, Benedict himself had had a hand in a half century earlier," he adds. (Remember, back when Fr. Joseph Ratzinger worked along side Karl Rahner, and was a peritus at Vatican II under Cardinal Frings?) There's much more to it than this bit here, but check it out. Food for thought.

[Hat tip to JM]

Tridentine Community News - Diocese of Marquette, MI, issues new norms for Sacred Music; BBC Radio on demand recording of EF Vespers at London Oratory; TLM Mass times


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (January31, 2016):
January 31, 2016 – Sexagésima Sunday

Diocese of Marquette, Michigan Issues New Norms for Sacred Music

Former Diocese of Marquette, Michigan Ordinary, [Arch]bishop Alexander Sample, now Archbishop of Portland, Oregon, is well-known for his devotion to the Sacred Liturgy in both the Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms. One of his most significant acts as bishop of that diocese was the publication on January 21, 2013 of “Rejoice in the Lord Always”, a pastoral letter on Sacred Music which explained the sorts of music that are appropriate for Holy Mass.

Current Marquette Ordinary, Bishop John Doerfler has expanded upon that work with the publication this past Tuesday, January 26 of “Sing to the Lord, All the Earth! An Instruction on Sacred Music in Divine Worship”. Targeted at celebrations of the Ordinary Form, the document directs that all parishes in the diocese will, by December 31, 2020, implement a series of norms, highlights of which follow:
  • All parishes and schools will learn to chant the Ordinary parts of the Mass in English that are found in the Roman Missal, and they will be sung by the congregation some of the time throughout the year.
  • All parishes and schools will learn to chant the [Latin] Kyrie, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei from the Missa Jubiláte Deo, and they will be sung by the congregation some of the time throughout the year.
  • All parishes and schools will learn to chant the Communion Antiphon in English to a very simple tone that everyone can sing, and the Communion Antiphon will be sung at every Sunday Mass. A hymn may be sung after the Communion Antiphon while the congregation is receiving the Blessed Sacrament.
  • A Diocesan Hymnal will be used to ensure the musical quality and doctrinal integrity of the Sacred Music. The hymnal will include a broad repertoire of hymns from classical to contemporary.
  • Once the diocesan hymnal is implemented, no other hymnal may be used.
Overall this is quite a commendable initiative, with the possible exception of the mandated hymnal. No one hymnal can ever hope to include all of the hymns suitable for the entire liturgical year. However, if the effort is to set a baseline standard to eliminate inappropriate music currently being used, then it is an understandable step. Poor quality sacred music is one of the main turn-offs and causes of desacralization of Catholic worship today. Conversely, requiring reverent and doctrinally sound music can only help to improve the Sensus Cathólicus of the faithful.

BBC Radio On Demand Recording of Extraordinary Form Vespers at the London Oratory

This column has many times made mention of the truly exceptional liturgical experience that is Vespers at the Brompton Oratory in London, England. A paid professional choir – among the best in the world – sings Vespers in the Extraordinary Form every Sunday at 3:30 PM, accompanied by a polyphonic Office Hymn and Magníficat. A gaggle of priests and brothers tend to the ceremonies in the sanctuary. The service concludes with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament [omitted in this particular broadcast], followed by a procession to a massive Side Altar dedicated to the Blessed Mother [photo below by Oratory Assistant Music Director Charles Cole], at which a polyphonic setting of the seasonal Marian antiphon is sung.


You now have the opportunity to listen to one of these magnificent Vespers services on-line: Through Sunday, February 21, 2016 a London Oratory Vespers broadcast is available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06vs27l. If you appreciate sacred music, you will find much to enjoy in this recording. It’s the gold standard to which every other choir serving traditional liturgy can aspire.

The broadcast is part of the BBC’s Choral Evensong series, which features similar services from Catholic and Anglican churches across the U.K.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 02/01 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (St. Ignatius of Antioch, Bishop & Martyr)
  • Tue. 02/02 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Josaphat (Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary)
  • Tue. 02/02 7:00 PM: High Mass at Holy Name of Mary (Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary) – Blessing of Candles and Procession precedes Mass
  • Fri. 02/05 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (Sacred Heart of Jesus) [First Friday]
  • Sun. 02/07: No Mass at OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart – Mass resumes at 9:45 AM the following Sunday, February 14
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for January 31, 2016. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
    Sunday

  • Sun. 01/31 7:30 AM and 10:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 45 minutes before and after Masses) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 8:00 and 10:30AM Low Mass (Confessions 1/2 hour before Mass: call beforehand) at St. Ann's Church, Livonia [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 9:30 AM: High Mass at St. Josaphat, Detroit (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 9:30 AM: High Mass at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 9:45 AM: High Mass at OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart, Bloomfield Hills (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 2:00 PM: High Mass at St. Alphonsus Church, Windsor, Canada (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/31 3:00 PM High Mass St. Matthew Catholic Church, Flint (Sexagesima Sunday - 2nd class)

    Monday

  • Mon. 02/01 7:30 AM: High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Ignatius of Antioch - 3rd class)
  • Mon. 02/01 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (St. Ignatius of Antioch - 3rd class)
  • Mon. 02/01 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat, Detroit (St. Ignatius of Antioch - 3rd class)
  • Mon. 02/01 7:00 PM: High Mass (usually) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Ignatius of Antioch - 3rd class)

    Tuesday

  • Tue. 02/02 7:00 AM High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Purification of the Belssed Virgin Mary - 2nd class)
  • Tue. 02/02 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Purification of the Belssed Virgin Mary - 2nd class)
  • Tue. 02/02 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Canada (Purification of the Belssed Virgin Mary - 2nd class)
  • Tue. 02/02 7:00 PM: Low Mass (usually) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Purification of the Belssed Virgin Mary - 2nd class)

    Wednesday

  • Wed. 01/03 7:30 AM: High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Feria - 4th class, or or St. Blaise - 4th class)
  • Wed. 01/03 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Feria - 4th class, or or St. Blaise - 4th class)
  • Wed. 01/03 7:00 PM: High Mass (usually) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Feria - 4th class, or or St. Blaise - 4th class)

    Thursday

  • Thu. 01/04 7:30 AM: High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Andrew Corsini - 3rd class, or or Jesus Christ the High Priest - 3rd class)
  • Thu. 01/04 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (St. Andrew Corsini - 3rd class, or or Jesus Christ the High Priest - 3rd class)
  • Thu. 01/04 7:00 PM: Low Mass (usually) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Andrew Corsini - 3rd class, or or Jesus Christ the High Priest - 3rd class)

    Friday

  • Fri. 01/05 7:30 AM: High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Agatha - 3rd class, or Sacred Heart of Jesus - 3rd class)
  • Fri. 01/05 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (St. Agatha - 3rd class, or Sacred Heart of Jesus - 3rd class)
  • Fri. 01/05 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat, Detroit (St. Agatha - 3rd class, or Sacred Heart of Jesus - 3rd class)
  • Fri. 01/05 7:00 PM: Low Mass (usually) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Agatha - 3rd class, or Sacred Heart of Jesus - 3rd class)

  • Saturday

  • Sat. 01/06 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 1/2 hour before Mass: call beforehand) at St. Ann's Church, Livonia [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (St. Titus - 3rd class, or Immaculate Heart of Mary - 3rd class)
  • Sat. 01/06 8:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (St. Titus - 3rd class, or Immaculate Heart of Mary - 3rd class)
  • Sat. 01/06 7:30 AM: High or Low Mass (varies) at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (St. Titus - 3rd class, or Immaculate Heart of Mary - 3rd class)
  • Sat. 01/06 6:00 PM Tridentine Mass at SS. Cyril & Methodius Slovak Catholic Church, Sterling Heights (St. Titus - 3rd class, or Immaculate Heart of Mary - 3rd class)

    Sunday

  • Sun. 01/07 7:30 AM and 10:00 AM: Low Mass (Confessions 45 minutes before and after Masses) at St. Joseph's Church, Richmond [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 8:00 and 10:30AM Low Mass (Confessions 1/2 hour before Mass: call beforehand) at St. Ann's Church, Livonia [NB: See note at bottom of this post about SSPX sites.]* (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 9:30 AM: High Mass at St. Josaphat, Detroit (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 9:30 AM: High Mass at Assumption Grotto, Detroit (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 9:45 AM: High Mass at OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart, Bloomfield Hills (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 2:00 PM: High Mass at St. Alphonsus Church, Windsor, Canada (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)
  • Sun. 01/07 3:00 PM High Mass St. Matthew Catholic Church, Flint (Quinquagesima Sunday - 2nd class)

    * NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins." These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Rome's "Family Day" - Defiant Catholic Laity against "same-sex unions", despite little support from the Vatican

As reported by Rorate Caeli today, the "Cirinnà Bill" being debated in the Italian Parliament to allow "same-sex unions" in that central nation of Catholicism managed to bring Catholics from all over Italy to Rome this Saturday.


"The image from the Circo Massimo is unmistakable: on this 'Family Day', a huge multitude of Italian families (including many friends of this blog) gathered to protest the government's support of the counternatural bill."

Another terrific discussion in Download: "Tradition under fire"


Yes indeed: another excellent Download, a half-hour panel discussion this time of the Anglican Ordinariate, Summorum Pontificum, and the "blowback" and fallout the Church has witnessed -- partricularly for Summorum Pontificum -- from both clerics and laity who identify the post-Vatican II regnum as a rejection of pre-Vatican II tradition: "Tradition Under Fire" (Church Militant, January 29, 2016). A bit of Anglican history about the Book of Common Prayer, a bit of Catholic history about the liturgical changes spanning the last five decades, and a fine discussion of what is at stake.